September Parent Guide Activities - BEDTIME STORIES

September Parent Guide Activities - BEDTIME STORIES

This month's theme is BEDTIME STORIES! Whether it's getting ready for bed, sleeping, or learning about animals that are awake while we are sleeping, these stories will help your little ones dream big!

Starting with the Bitty Box, we had three sturdy board books - Goodnight, Mr. Panda, Wow! It's Night-Time, and Bedtime Baby. 

Language Concepts & Book Interaction:

  • Create your own bedtime routine to make sure you don't forget anything like Panda and his friends! Template available to download and print HERE.
  • Print out the Goodnight, Mr. Panda colouring sheet HERE (generously provided from Scholastic). Can you design some funky pyjamas for Mr. Panda? You might want to draw them, or try collecting things to make a collage.

Language Concepts & Book Interaction:

  • Watch the sunset before bedtime and talk about what kind of animals sleep during the night, and which animals are awake. Notice what you can hear and see in the dark. Can you hear any bats or insects?
  • Owl watches all the different animals emerging from their homes into the night. Talk about the different types of homes animals live in, especially those animals you might see in your area. Where does a kangaroo live? How about a snake, or a lizard?
  • Learn how to make lots of little owls out of cupcake liners! Simple step-by-step instructions available HERE.

Language Concepts & Book Interaction:

  • Allow your little one to explore the book independently before demonstrating how to interact with the lift-the-flap and rotating wheel.
  • One of the babies was snuggling with a teddy. Do you have a special toy that you take to bed?

Next up is our Biggie Box. In this month's box we had two gorgeous hardcover books: Sleep Tight, Platypup and The Star in the Forest.

Language Concepts:

Sleep Tight, Platypup uses lots of dialogue between Platypup and Mummy to tell the story, which can be a bit tricky for newly independent readers. To help, try reading it through the first time together, explaining that quotation marks (") represent speaking, and each set of them usually belong to one person.

This book also introduces the concept of personification, (with the moon dancing, the leaves whispering, the gumnuts knocking, and the grass crinkling.

Discussion Topics:

  • Before reading - what kind of book do you think this is? Encourage readers to use the title and cover illustrations as clues. 
  • While reading – do you think there is something scary outside the burrow, or is Platypup hearing things that aren't really scary? Like the wind?
  • Everyone gets scared sometimes - are you ever afraid of the dark like Platypup? What kind of things can you do when you're scared to feel better? Talk with your child about all the ways to be brave and share different things you like to do when you're feeling scared. Adults get scared too sometimes, and that's ok!
  • Have you ever gone on a night-time adventure with your parents like Platypup did? Where did you go, and what did you do?

Hands-On Activities:

  • Watch the sunset before bedtime and talk about what kind of animals sleep during the night, and which animals are awake. Notice what you can hear and see in the dark. Can you hear any bats or insects?
  • At the end of the book, Platypup goes back to sleep. What do you think he might be dreaming of? Draw a picture showing all the things Platypup might be dreaming of.

Language Concepts:

 

The Star in the Forest introduces readers to lots of great describing words (adjectives) and dialogue between the main characters, Pip and Maisie. After something falls from the sky into the forest, children will enjoy guessing what the girls might find on their adventure.

Discussion Topics:

  • Before reading - what do you think this book might be about? Encourage readers to use the title and cover illustrations as clues. 
  • While reading - what do you think the girls might find in the forest?
  • After reading - what would you do if you found a fallen star? Would you take it home?
  • The two sisters, Maisie and Pip, are very different from each other. At the beginning of the story, Maisie dreamed of going on an adventure, while Pip was happy to watch the stars at home. Are you more like Maisie or Pip?

Hands-On Activities:

  • Learn all about fallen stars i.e., meteorites! What can you learn about them? How often do stars fall down to Earth?
  • Go on a special night-time adventure walk with your child. Bring torches like Pip and Maisie, or even a headlamp and if the world looks any different at night. How many night-time animals can you spot? Are there any animals you haven't seen before?
  • The artwork in The Star in the Forest uses a lot of beautiful watercolours. Using the step by step guide HERE, to make your own set of watercolour paints using food colouring! You can then use your paints to create a watercolour artwork inspired by the beautiful artwork in the book.

Our Family Box included one book from our Bitty Box and one from our Biggie Box. This month's books were Sleep TIght, Platypup and Goodnight, Mr. Panda.

xx Karly
Owner, Bookieboo 

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